2019 Aviation Little League Baseball Tryouts



2019 Aviation Little League Baseball Tryouts



Saturday, January 19th, 2018 & Sunday, January 20th, 2018

Location: Laidlaw Field and/or Trotter Field
12601 Isis Ave, Hawthorne, California 90250



Saturday, January 19th, 2018

Triple A Division
10:30am

Majors Division
12:30pm


Sunday, January 20th, 2018

Double AA Division
11:00am

Softball Division 
12:00pm




Make up day for tryouts TBD

Please email us at aviationreg1960 to be added to the Aviation Tryouts make up list. Our player agent will reach out to you on the time of your tryout on Saturday, January 19th.


 (New, Change from last year)
No Tryouts for the Following Divisions

Tee Ball
Single A
50/70



 

Important Parent Information
 
Tryouts is mandatory for all players registered Double A, Softball, Triple A, and Majors division playing this upcoming Spring season. Players must attend ONE of the two tryouts dates.

If you are unable to attend  your child division tryout date  but wish to tryout the following week, Please emails us at
[email protected].
 
If your Child doesn't attend tryouts, he/she will not be allowed to participate in the Aviation Little League Baseball Draft, thus will not be placed on a team until the tryout requirement is fulfilled. Please plan ahead to attend our tryouts. 

Players who register after tryouts, will be place on a waiting list until the player(s) are evaluated by the league's Player Agent.  

 
 

What to Bring to Tryouts

Parents, Please arrive 30 minutes before tryouts to warm up your child
Baseball Attire is Optional but recommended for a great experience for your Child
Cleats required (No Saddles or Crocs)
Make sure your Child brings their Glove, Bat, a few Balls, and Helmet. 
Please Don't forget to bring Water for your child.


Tips for a better experience for your child

Make sure you child goes to sleep early
Please practice with your Child at home prior tryouts. 

What to Expect at Tryouts

Your Child will be assigned a number at check in.
Prior to tryouts, League Officials will present an Orientation to the participants let them know what to expect at Tryouts. Parents are not allowed to be on the field.



 What Drills to Expect
(Subject to Change)

Catching -Two line catch with participants (10 minutes)

Running Drills - 40 Yard Dash – two participants running at a time (timed)

Throwing

Grounder to SS to First base (5 attempts)

Left field Pop ups to 2nd base (5 throws)

Pitching to the catcher (coach) 5 pitches

Hitting- Coach pitching (5 pitches)

Please email us at [email protected] for any questions or concerns in regards to tryouts or registration .


Preparing for Tryouts


Getting You and Your Little Leaguer® Ready for Tryouts              

From The Parent Connection, Volume 2 * Issue 2 * February 2014 Issue

Tryouts can be more nerve-racking for parents than the Little Leaguer®. Here’s some info to ease you through the process.

After registration, player tryouts are the next step in getting back on the field. To have teams, you need players and a tryout is how your local league evaluates a child’s baseball and softball abilities. Every league has its own way of running tryouts, so if you have questions seek out a local league official for answers.

At tryouts, leagues often will have bats and helmets available for players to wear, so there is no need (yet) to go out and buy new gear. For now, getting your player prepped for what to expect when you arrive is the first priority.

  • As you prepare for tryouts, check to see if your player’s hand still fits in the glove and if the glove is still in good shape. If it looks like it can handle another season, loosen it up with some glove oil.

  • If possible, try to find a place where you and your Little Leaguer can throw a ball. Simply having a game of catch will help to wake up the muscles and remind the body and mind that spring will soon be here.


    Tryouts can be more nerve-racking for parents than the Little Leaguer®. Here’s some info to ease you through the process.

    After registration, player tryouts are the next step in getting back on the field. To have teams, you need players and a tryout is how your local league evaluates a child’s baseball and softball abilities. Every league has its own way of running tryouts, so if you have questions seek out a local league official for answers.

    At tryouts, leagues often will have bats and helmets available for players to wear, so there is no need (yet) to go out and buy new gear. For now, getting your player prepped for what to expect when you arrive is the first priority.

  • As you prepare for tryouts, check to see if your player’s hand still fits in the glove and if the glove is still in good shape. If it looks like it can handle another season, loosen it up with some glove oil.

  • If possible, try to find a place where you and your Little Leaguer can throw a ball. Simply having a game of catch will help to wake up the muscles and remind the body and mind that spring will soon be here.


    Whether the tryout is inside or not, each player will be evaluated and assessed with a grading system that is established by the local league officials.

  • It is typical that each player will receive a grade based on ability, aptitude and age, but each league decides how it will evaluate players. Following all of the tryouts, the players will be placed into a draft pool that the volunteer managers will use to choose from to determine their teams for the season.

  • Leagues almost always offer multiple tryout dates, but there may be those that plan different tryout times on the same day. Check your local newspaper, league website, school(s) office, or social media.

  • Players can tryout more than once and they can also tryout for different divisions. If a player is unable to attend any of the scheduled tryout dates, the local Board of Directors can consider other options to evaluate a player, but this would require a special circumstance (illness, injury, inability to attend) that is explained to the Board prior to the tryout date(s).

  • At the time of tryouts, some leagues may have selected their team managers, but it is not required. Often the managers are selected after the draft based on the number of players that are expected to be playing in a given division. All potential managerial candidates are invited to evaluate at tryouts.


    With a large volume of kids attending, tryouts can be an overly enthusiastic, energized hustle of activity for both the player and parent. A solid piece of parental advice is to remember that your player will not be in mid-season form. When quietly watching your son or daughter, have realistic expectations and remind them to do the same. Reserve any judgments and do not criticize their performance. Remember, it is a long season, so start it off right with a high-five, pat on the back, and “good job” regardless of how your child performs at tryouts.

     


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